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History of Killester Parish

Origin of the name Killester 

The meaning of the place-name Killester has often been disputed, and throughout the centuries it has been referred to by many spellings and indeed various pronunciations. Archbishop Laurence O’Toole referred to it as “Quillesra”, in the 12th century, and King John called it “Tudressa”. It has also been called “Kylestre”, “Kyllester” and “Xyllester”. The Irish name “Cill Easra” and its English interpretation seems to be the most logical meaning - “The Church of Esra”. 

This would infer that someone called Esra built the church or gave land for it. In the closing years of the Celtic age, and even during the years of Norse settlements in the city and county of Dublin, there was a church at Killester dedicated to St. Brigid. The first raid upon Dublin by the Norsemen came in the year 795, when they attacked the monastery on Lambay island, and during the next two centuries many incursions were made into the county. Before the beginning of the 10th century these raids had become invasions, and Dublin had become a Danish Kingdom ruled by Sitric the First. Later this kingdom stretched over the northern part of the county and even into Wicklow and Meath. In time the Norsemen had established important settlements at Waterford, Cork and Limerick. 

Although the increasing power of the invader had often been challenged by the Irish, the real confrontation did not take place until Brian Boru overthrew their authority in Munster and Malachy did likewise in Meath. The final decisive battle came in 1014, when Brian scored a historic victory over the enemy in neighbouring Clontarf and shattered their despotic rule in Ireland. Twelve years previous to Clontarf, Brian Boru had permitted King Sitric the Fourth to retain his kingship of Dublin, purely for political and economic reasons. Sitric, like other settled Danes, did not take part in the battle. He had become Christian and had settled well into the life-style of the Irish. In 1038 he chose his friend Donat to be the first Bishop of Dublin. He gave him a site on the top of the hill of Dublin to build a Cathedral ... the place where his “Cathedra”, or the place where his Bishop’s throne should be. 

When St. Laurence O’Toole was elected by the people and clergy in 1162 to the high office of Archbishop of Dublin, he changed the constitution of Christ Church from that of a secular cathedral to that of a Priory of the Arroasian Order. Until that time the little chapel at Killester, dedicated to St. Brigid, was appendant to the monastery at Swords.. This institution had suffered greatly over the centuries from the marauding Norse and Irish raiders in their many combats, so it was considered prudent to transfer the dependency of the church to the Priory of the Holy Trinity (Christ Church). 

Killester Church 

With the building of the houses on the lands of Killester in the 1920’s, a church became necessary for the spiritual needs of the new community. 

As Parish Priest of the combined parish, Father James McCarroll engaged the services of Messrs. Donnelly, Moore and Keatinge, Architects and Consulting Engineers, to provide plans for the new church. Two prospective sites were then selected for approval in June 1924. One of these was the present site and the other was immediately adjacent to the farmlands of Venetian Hall. The architect did not recommend the second site as it became very narrow as it neared the railway line, and also because there was a high and unsightly hay barn close by. 

Work on the church began in the second half of 1924 and the builder employed was J.J.Flanagan of Kyle House, Drumcondra. As the work neared completion, Fr. McCarroll wrote to the Archbishop’s secretary seeking confirmation of his suggested name for the church. He had a preference for having it dedicated to the Sacred Heart, but if this did not meet with the Archbishop’s approval, he would suggest St. Ita, foster mother of St. Brendan, the patron of Coolock church. As a footnote he added that the old parish church of Killester had St. Brigid as a Patroness. It is now obvious which suggestion met with the Archbishop’s approval! 

The completed project turned out to be a beautiful edifice in the Florentine style with a square pedimental bell tower. Its characteristics coupled with the pleasing appeal of its surroundings gave it a very attractive appearance. 

The church was consecrated by the Archbishop of Dublin, Dr. Edward Byrne, on the 26th September 1926 in the presence of a large congregation. With the large growth of housing developments in the 1940’s and 1950’s it became necessary to increase the length of the church . The well-known Dublin firm of architects Robinson. Keefe and Devane was retained to plan and supervise the project. The work was carried out by John Lambe, builder, of North Strand. The extension, which included a well balanced sanctuary, was blessed by Archbishop McQuaid on 27th July 1952.

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The Relic of St. Brigid

In 1929 a small portion of St. Brigid’s skull was brought back to Ireland and placed here for the veneration of the people. At the time it came as a great surprise to the majority of Irish people that this relic existed, and that it had been carefully preserved in Portugal, where for hundreds of years the Portuguese had almost made St. Brigid their own. 

The Holy Relic is preserved in an unpretentious church in Lumiar, a small town outside Lisbon. King Dinis had a small convent of Cistercians founded there during his reign, at a place called Odivelas, a few miles outside Lisbon and quite near Luimar. 

In 1276 the Bishop of Lisbon decided to build a church at Luimar and he placed it under the patronage of the nuns at Odivilelas. When King Dinis heard that three Irish knights were bringing St. Brigid’s head to Portugal, he wanted to have it preserved in the convent of Odivelas, but Divine Will decreed otherwise; it was placed in the church at Lumiar, where it remains to this day. 

The three faithful knights remained with the Holy Relic for the rest of their days, and when they died they were interred in tombs let into the wall of St. Brigid’s chapel. The inscription reads: 

Here in these three tombs lie the three Irish knights who brought the head of St. Brigid, Virgin, a native of Ireland, whose relic is preserved in this chapel. In memory of which, the officials of the Table of the same Saint caused this to be done in January A.D. 1283. 

A portion of the skull was given to the Rev. Father Traynor of Killester, under seal of the Cardinal of Lisbon, on November 16th 1928 for Killester Church. The Archbishop of Dublin approved it on November 26th 1928, and on Sunday 27th 1929, the solemn ceremony of translation took place.

%relic-image -alt%

The Church is the Body of Christ and its mission is to continue the work of Jesus Christ on earth.

Parish Team

Parish Priest 
Fr. Liam Ó Cuív
Telephone: 01-833 3793

Sacristan 
Pat Phelan
Telephone: 01-833 2974

Parish Secretary
Cathy Murray 
Telephone: 01-833 2974
Email: killesterparish@gmail.com 

Parish Centre Coordinator
Karol Stout
Telephone: 01-853 4030
Email: resourcekillester@gmail.com

Parish Pastoral Council

The Parish Pastoral Council seeks to carry out this work in Killester by means of procedures, programmes and processes designed to improve or facilitate :

  • The proclamation of the Word of God,
  • Faith formation and catechesis,
  • The celebration of the Sacraments,
  • The fostering and support of Christian family life,
  • Ministry to the poor, sick, elderly and handicapped,
  • The promotion of issues of social justice,
  • The inclusion in its ministry of youth and those who have ceased to practise the faith or who have no faith.

The Parish Pastoral Council is broadly representative of all strands of  parish life. 


Safeguarding

Child Protection Policy of St. Brigid’s Parish 

Policy Statement

The Parish of St. Brigid’s, Killester, recognises that children and young people are made in the image and likeness of God and encourages their participation in the liturgies and social, sporting and recreational activities of the parish, in a manner which respects and enhances that dignity. The Parish will use its best endeavours to ensure that such participation by children and young people will be in a safe environment, devoid of abuse, whether physical, sexual or emotional. 

Guidelines in this area are operated to a high standard. The following guidelines apply:

Safeguarding Children from the National Board for Safeguarding children in the Catholic Church is the most up to date church policy and is available at https://www.safeguarding.ie

  • The State's Children First guidelines apply in all our schools and guidelines in the Diocese are consistent with state policy. https://www.tusla.ie/children-first/children-first-guidance-and-legislation/
  • Anyone in this parish working with children - employees, volunteers and priests - are required to participate in Garda Vetting. Details of that process are available at http://csps.dublindiocese.ie/category/garda-vetting/
  • The Child protection policy that operates in this parish is available from the Parish office, Telephone 01 833 2974
  • In this parish we have a Child Protection Representative John Gallagher who can  be contacted at 01 831 7853
  • It is of utmost importance that anyone who may have suffered abuse, or who knows of anyone who may have suffered abuse, is aware that they can contact the Child Protection Service of the Archdiocese at 01 836 0314. The website is http://csps.dublindiocese.ie 

Every effort is made to try and ensure that children participating in all aspects of parish life are safe and welcome.

%safeguarding-image -alt%

St. Brigid's Boys National School

St. Brigid’s B.N.S. is an all boys school in Dublin North City catering for pupils from junior infants to sixth class. The school acknowledges the right of each pupil to enjoy school in a secure and safe environment. St. Brigid's promotes habits of mutual respect, courtesy and an awareness of the interdependence of people within the school and larger community. 

We aim: 

  • To create a welcoming, secure and caring environment in which all can happily work.
  • To offer a broad, balanced and relevant curriculum to meet the needs of all our pupils.
  • To ensure that all the children under our care will complete the primary school cycle with adequate levels of proficiency in literacy and numeracy. 
  • To provide religious education for the children and to prepare them for the sacraments of Reconciliation, Eucharist and Confirmation. 

All staff members share a collective responsibility under the direction of the principal teacher for the above. The school management recognises the rights of parents to share in the task of making the school a pleasant and safe environment for all children.

Address
Howth Road Killester Dublin 5

Contact
Email: info@stbrigidsbns.ie
Telephone: (01) 8336149
Website: http://www.stbrigidsbns.ie

Principal: Nuala Cullen

%boys-school-image -alt%

St. Brigid's Girls National School

St. Brigid's G.N.S. was established by the Holy Faith Sisters in 1928 to cater for the educational needs of the children of Killester parish and the surrounding area. The school supports the principles of: 

"inclusiveness, equality of access and participation in the school and respect for diversity of values, beliefs, traditions, languages and ways of life in society" 

We are committed to nurturing the Catholic faith through religious education, preparation for the sacraments and through the ethos of the school. The ethos is demonstrated through respect shown for each person in the school - pupils, members of staff, parents and visitors. We value our relationship with parents and the community and we are committed to working in partnership with all involved in the education process so as the best interests of each child are catered for.

Address
St. Brigids Road,
Killester,
Dublin 5

Contact
Email: info@stbrigidsgns.ie
Telephone: +353 (1) 831 5138
Website: https://www.stbrigidsgns.ie

Principal: Lorna Diffley

%girls-school-image -alt%

Choir and Music

Music matters to Killester Parish, and we are glad to draw on the talents of our parishioners, who give their time and services generously in many areas, and music is no exception.

Parish Choir
Being part of the  Adult Parish Choir involves a commitment of just 2 hours a week: 1 hour rehearsing on Tuesday evenings, and 1 hour singing at the 12.00 p.m. Mass on Sundays. Practice  takes place in the Parish Resource Centre, Howth Road at 7.30 p.m. on Tuesdays. The choir is trained by organist Eileen Dwyer. New members are always welcome, so if you are interested in giving it a try - simply contact Eileen at   01 847 7198 for more information

Pipe Organ
We are fortunate to have a two manual Conacher pipe organ situated in the gallery which sounds  well and is complemented by the church acoustics. It's a great asset for Mass, weddings, funeral services  and other devotions.

Organists
The following organists work regularly in St. Brigid's at the various services, including Mass, Funerals and Weddings:

  • Eileen Dwyer  
    Telephone: 01 847 7198
  • Eugene Dolan
    Telephone 087 284 5368  or 01 833 1278

Music also features at the Family Mass (Sundays 10:30am) at which the congregation are encouraged to sing with organ accompaniment.

%music-image -alt%

History of Killester Parish

Origin of the name Killester 

The meaning of the place-name Killester has often been disputed, and throughout the centuries it has been referred to by many spellings and indeed various pronunciations. Archbishop Laurence O’Toole referred to it as “Quillesra”, in the 12th century, and King John called it “Tudressa”. It has also been called “Kylestre”, “Kyllester” and “Xyllester”. The Irish name “Cill Easra” and its English interpretation seems to be the most logical meaning - “The Church of Esra”. 

This would infer that someone called Esra built the church or gave land for it. In the closing years of the Celtic age, and even during the years of Norse settlements in the city and county of Dublin, there was a church at Killester dedicated to St. Brigid. The first raid upon Dublin by the Norsemen came in the year 795, when they attacked the monastery on Lambay island, and during the next two centuries many incursions were made into the county. Before the beginning of the 10th century these raids had become invasions, and Dublin had become a Danish Kingdom ruled by Sitric the First. Later this kingdom stretched over the northern part of the county and even into Wicklow and Meath. In time the Norsemen had established important settlements at Waterford, Cork and Limerick. 

Although the increasing power of the invader had often been challenged by the Irish, the real confrontation did not take place until Brian Boru overthrew their authority in Munster and Malachy did likewise in Meath. The final decisive battle came in 1014, when Brian scored a historic victory over the enemy in neighbouring Clontarf and shattered their despotic rule in Ireland. Twelve years previous to Clontarf, Brian Boru had permitted King Sitric the Fourth to retain his kingship of Dublin, purely for political and economic reasons. Sitric, like other settled Danes, did not take part in the battle. He had become Christian and had settled well into the life-style of the Irish. In 1038 he chose his friend Donat to be the first Bishop of Dublin. He gave him a site on the top of the hill of Dublin to build a Cathedral ... the place where his “Cathedra”, or the place where his Bishop’s throne should be. 

When St. Laurence O’Toole was elected by the people and clergy in 1162 to the high office of Archbishop of Dublin, he changed the constitution of Christ Church from that of a secular cathedral to that of a Priory of the Arroasian Order. Until that time the little chapel at Killester, dedicated to St. Brigid, was appendant to the monastery at Swords.. This institution had suffered greatly over the centuries from the marauding Norse and Irish raiders in their many combats, so it was considered prudent to transfer the dependency of the church to the Priory of the Holy Trinity (Christ Church). 

Killester Church 

With the building of the houses on the lands of Killester in the 1920’s, a church became necessary for the spiritual needs of the new community. 

As Parish Priest of the combined parish, Father James McCarroll engaged the services of Messrs. Donnelly, Moore and Keatinge, Architects and Consulting Engineers, to provide plans for the new church. Two prospective sites were then selected for approval in June 1924. One of these was the present site and the other was immediately adjacent to the farmlands of Venetian Hall. The architect did not recommend the second site as it became very narrow as it neared the railway line, and also because there was a high and unsightly hay barn close by. 

Work on the church began in the second half of 1924 and the builder employed was J.J.Flanagan of Kyle House, Drumcondra. As the work neared completion, Fr. McCarroll wrote to the Archbishop’s secretary seeking confirmation of his suggested name for the church. He had a preference for having it dedicated to the Sacred Heart, but if this did not meet with the Archbishop’s approval, he would suggest St. Ita, foster mother of St. Brendan, the patron of Coolock church. As a footnote he added that the old parish church of Killester had St. Brigid as a Patroness. It is now obvious which suggestion met with the Archbishop’s approval! 

The completed project turned out to be a beautiful edifice in the Florentine style with a square pedimental bell tower. Its characteristics coupled with the pleasing appeal of its surroundings gave it a very attractive appearance. 

The church was consecrated by the Archbishop of Dublin, Dr. Edward Byrne, on the 26th September 1926 in the presence of a large congregation. With the large growth of housing developments in the 1940’s and 1950’s it became necessary to increase the length of the church . The well-known Dublin firm of architects Robinson. Keefe and Devane was retained to plan and supervise the project. The work was carried out by John Lambe, builder, of North Strand. The extension, which included a well balanced sanctuary, was blessed by Archbishop McQuaid on 27th July 1952.

%parish-history-image -alt%

The Relic of St. Brigid

In 1929 a small portion of St. Brigid’s skull was brought back to Ireland and placed here for the veneration of the people. At the time it came as a great surprise to the majority of Irish people that this relic existed, and that it had been carefully preserved in Portugal, where for hundreds of years the Portuguese had almost made St. Brigid their own. 

The Holy Relic is preserved in an unpretentious church in Lumiar, a small town outside Lisbon. King Dinis had a small convent of Cistercians founded there during his reign, at a place called Odivelas, a few miles outside Lisbon and quite near Luimar. 

In 1276 the Bishop of Lisbon decided to build a church at Luimar and he placed it under the patronage of the nuns at Odivilelas. When King Dinis heard that three Irish knights were bringing St. Brigid’s head to Portugal, he wanted to have it preserved in the convent of Odivelas, but Divine Will decreed otherwise; it was placed in the church at Lumiar, where it remains to this day. 

The three faithful knights remained with the Holy Relic for the rest of their days, and when they died they were interred in tombs let into the wall of St. Brigid’s chapel. The inscription reads: 

Here in these three tombs lie the three Irish knights who brought the head of St. Brigid, Virgin, a native of Ireland, whose relic is preserved in this chapel. In memory of which, the officials of the Table of the same Saint caused this to be done in January A.D. 1283. 

A portion of the skull was given to the Rev. Father Traynor of Killester, under seal of the Cardinal of Lisbon, on November 16th 1928 for Killester Church. The Archbishop of Dublin approved it on November 26th 1928, and on Sunday 27th 1929, the solemn ceremony of translation took place.

%relic-image -alt%

The Church is the Body of Christ and its mission is to continue the work of Jesus Christ on earth.

Parish Team

Parish Priest 
Fr. Liam Ó Cuív
Telephone: 01-833 3793

Sacristan 
Pat Phelan
Telephone: 01-833 2974

Parish Secretary
Cathy Murray 
Telephone: 01-833 2974
Email: killesterparish@gmail.com 

Parish Centre Coordinator
Karol Stout
Telephone: 01-853 4030
Email: resourcekillester@gmail.com

Parish Pastoral Council

The Parish Pastoral Council seeks to carry out this work in Killester by means of procedures, programmes and processes designed to improve or facilitate :

  • The proclamation of the Word of God,
  • Faith formation and catechesis,
  • The celebration of the Sacraments,
  • The fostering and support of Christian family life,
  • Ministry to the poor, sick, elderly and handicapped,
  • The promotion of issues of social justice,
  • The inclusion in its ministry of youth and those who have ceased to practise the faith or who have no faith.

The Parish Pastoral Council is broadly representative of all strands of  parish life. 


Safeguarding

Child Protection Policy of St. Brigid’s Parish 

Policy Statement

The Parish of St. Brigid’s, Killester, recognises that children and young people are made in the image and likeness of God and encourages their participation in the liturgies and social, sporting and recreational activities of the parish, in a manner which respects and enhances that dignity. The Parish will use its best endeavours to ensure that such participation by children and young people will be in a safe environment, devoid of abuse, whether physical, sexual or emotional. 

Guidelines in this area are operated to a high standard. The following guidelines apply:

Safeguarding Children from the National Board for Safeguarding children in the Catholic Church is the most up to date church policy and is available at https://www.safeguarding.ie

  • The State's Children First guidelines apply in all our schools and guidelines in the Diocese are consistent with state policy. https://www.tusla.ie/children-first/children-first-guidance-and-legislation/
  • Anyone in this parish working with children - employees, volunteers and priests - are required to participate in Garda Vetting. Details of that process are available at http://csps.dublindiocese.ie/category/garda-vetting/
  • The Child protection policy that operates in this parish is available from the Parish office, Telephone 01 833 2974
  • In this parish we have a Child Protection Representative John Gallagher who can  be contacted at 01 831 7853
  • It is of utmost importance that anyone who may have suffered abuse, or who knows of anyone who may have suffered abuse, is aware that they can contact the Child Protection Service of the Archdiocese at 01 836 0314. The website is http://csps.dublindiocese.ie 

Every effort is made to try and ensure that children participating in all aspects of parish life are safe and welcome.

%safeguarding-image -alt%

Choir and Music

Music matters to Killester Parish, and we are glad to draw on the talents of our parishioners, who give their time and services generously in many areas, and music is no exception.

Parish Choir
Being part of the  Adult Parish Choir involves a commitment of just 2 hours a week: 1 hour rehearsing on Tuesday evenings, and 1 hour singing at the 12.00 p.m. Mass on Sundays. Practice  takes place in the Parish Resource Centre, Howth Road at 7.30 p.m. on Tuesdays. The choir is trained by organist Eileen Dwyer. New members are always welcome, so if you are interested in giving it a try - simply contact Eileen at   01 847 7198 for more information

Pipe Organ
We are fortunate to have a two manual Conacher pipe organ situated in the gallery which sounds  well and is complemented by the church acoustics. It's a great asset for Mass, weddings, funeral services  and other devotions.

Organists
The following organists work regularly in St. Brigid's at the various services, including Mass, Funerals and Weddings:

  • Eileen Dwyer  
    Telephone: 01 847 7198
  • Eugene Dolan
    Telephone 087 284 5368  or 01 833 1278

Music also features at the Family Mass (Sundays 10:30am) at which the congregation are encouraged to sing with organ accompaniment.

%music-image -alt%

St. Brigid's Boys National School

St. Brigid’s B.N.S. is an all boys school in Dublin North City catering for pupils from junior infants to sixth class. The school acknowledges the right of each pupil to enjoy school in a secure and safe environment. St. Brigid's promotes habits of mutual respect, courtesy and an awareness of the interdependence of people within the school and larger community. 

We aim: 

  • To create a welcoming, secure and caring environment in which all can happily work.
  • To offer a broad, balanced and relevant curriculum to meet the needs of all our pupils.
  • To ensure that all the children under our care will complete the primary school cycle with adequate levels of proficiency in literacy and numeracy. 
  • To provide religious education for the children and to prepare them for the sacraments of Reconciliation, Eucharist and Confirmation. 

All staff members share a collective responsibility under the direction of the principal teacher for the above. The school management recognises the rights of parents to share in the task of making the school a pleasant and safe environment for all children.

Address
Howth Road Killester Dublin 5

Contact
Email: info@stbrigidsbns.ie
Telephone: (01) 8336149
Website: http://www.stbrigidsbns.ie

Principal: Nuala Cullen

%boys-school-image -alt%

St. Brigid's Girls National School

St. Brigid's G.N.S. was established by the Holy Faith Sisters in 1928 to cater for the educational needs of the children of Killester parish and the surrounding area. The school supports the principles of: 

"inclusiveness, equality of access and participation in the school and respect for diversity of values, beliefs, traditions, languages and ways of life in society" 

We are committed to nurturing the Catholic faith through religious education, preparation for the sacraments and through the ethos of the school. The ethos is demonstrated through respect shown for each person in the school - pupils, members of staff, parents and visitors. We value our relationship with parents and the community and we are committed to working in partnership with all involved in the education process so as the best interests of each child are catered for.

Address
St. Brigids Road,
Killester,
Dublin 5

Contact
Email: info@stbrigidsgns.ie
Telephone: +353 (1) 831 5138
Website: https://www.stbrigidsgns.ie

Principal: Lorna Diffley

%girls-school-image -alt%